What Is The Origin Of The Saying For Pete’S Sake?

Why is it clean as a whistle?

“Clean as a whistle” first appeared in print in the early 18th century, meaning “completely, absolutely, leaving no trace” (“A first rate shot; … head taken off as clean as a whistle,” 1849)..

Is for Pete’s sake an idiom?

Although there are some fascinating idiom origins, one that people might also be curious about is, “for Pete’s sake!” And, for Pete’s sake, you should. The phrase essentially uses “Pete” as a mild substitute for God or Christ in an expression of annoyance or frustration.

Why do we say Heavens to Betsy?

Origin of Heavens to Betsy It may have originated sometime between the years 1850 and 1914. Heavens to Betsy is another variation of the phrase for Heaven’s sake, which began as a euphemism for what some considered the blasphemous for God’s sake and for Christ’s sake.

Why is it called Dressed to the nines?

One theory is that it comes from the name of the 99th Wiltshire Regiment, known as the Nines, which was renowned for its smart appearance. Why it should have been to the nines rather than to the eights, to the sevens, etc. …

What is a Betsy?

Origin: English. Meaning: God Is My Oath. The name Betsy means God Is My Oath and is of English origin. Betsy is a name that’s been used primarily by parents who are considering baby names for girls. Diminutive form of the name Elizabeth.

Why do we say Bob’s your uncle?

The origins are uncertain, but a common theory is that the expression arose after Conservative Prime Minister Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (“Bob”) appointed his nephew Arthur Balfour as Chief Secretary for Ireland in 1887, an act of nepotism, which was apparently both surprising and unpopular.

What does at 6’s and 7’s mean?

“At sixes and sevens” is an English idiom used to describe a condition of confusion or disarray.

What does the saying for Pete’s sake mean?

for Pete’s sake (idiomatic, euphemistic) Used to expresses frustration, exasperation, annoyance. For Pete’s sake, get off the computer! You’ve been on there for ages!

Who is Pete in for Petes sake?

They have their origins as being substitute phrases for something stronger. In this case, these idioms were used as replacements for “for Christ’s sake”, “for God’s sake”, “for the love of God”, etc. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the name “Pete” in these exclamations is chiefly a euphemism for God.

Where did the saying for crying out loud come from?

For crying out loud” is said to originate from the expression “for Christ’s sake.” How you get from “for Christ’s sake” to “for crying out loud” I don’t know, but I bet it has something to do with a father who was displeased with the incessant crying of his sprout. …

Why do we say fit as a fiddle?

The violin was picked out as the exemplar because of the alliteration of fit and fiddle, and because the violin is a beautifully shaped instrument producing a very particular sound. … But then fit came to mean ‘in good physical shape’ and so fit as a fiddle came to mean ‘in good condition physically’.

Where does happy as a clam come from?

The phrase most likely started as the longer phrase “happy as a clam at high tide,” and was popularized in the early 19th century, particularly in the northeastern United States. Clams can only be readily dug up by humans when the tide is low; in high water, they’re almost impossible to find.

Why do we say cute as a button?

Cute originally meant smart or clever. The button, as a fastening invention, is quite ingenious. As cute came to mean “attractive” or “pretty”, the phrase moved in meaning as well. Buttons were small delicate and elegantly decorated, comparable to (say) a cute doll.

What does beyond the pale mean?

“Beyond the pale” then became a colloquial phrase meaning “outside the limits of acceptable behavior or judgment.”

What does Old Betsy mean?

old beat up carA term used to describe an old beat up car (jalopy).

Where does the saying cat got your tongue?

Cat got your tongue? Origin: The English Navy used to use a whip called “Cat-o’-nine-tails” for flogging. The pain was so severe that it caused the victim to stay quiet for a long time. Another possible source could be from ancient Egypt, where liars’ and blasphemers’ tongues were cut out and fed to the cats.